Sunday, February 9, 2020

The Journey Through the River Valley of Manaus - the aim of the poem Personal Statement

The Journey Through the River Valley of Manaus - the aim of the poem - Personal Statement Example And I know from that day forth it was their very best year To have been freed from the hands of Margarethe De La Rue 40 If you had been there you would have seen it, too. And that is my story of my journey through the river valley of Manaus And how I freed the courtesans of the Amazon's "Pink House." This is the process of how I created my poem. The aim of this poem, The Journey Through the River Valley of Manaus, was to tell a humorous story, primarily, although, that was not the only one. I also wrote to entertain, as well as for personal enjoyment, because I happened to enjoy writing this particular piece. The metre was irregular, and the stanza form was A-B throughout. I kept the voice of the poem in first person because there is more personalism in that tense, I believe. My choice of language was helped by using two rhyming dictionaries.1 I only used repetition when talking about the journey of Manaus, and I think my best imagery in the whole poem dealt with regards to describing what the women in the Pink House were wearing (pearls, silk, and the like). I think, technically, this poem is the best that I am capable of doing as far as rhyme, imagery, and voice are concerned. I could probably do better as far as metre were concerned if I were classically trained in writing Sha kespearean quatrains, but alas, I have not the discipline or interest in writing such a poem frought in tedium. I know that must sound horribly cold and disrespectful to Shakespeare and those who appreciate his work, as do I, but I don't care to try to attempt something I know I'm not good at. I believe this poem is generally free of commonplace and hackneyed images, save for perhaps the mention of Christopher...I think, technically, this poem is the best that I am capable of doing as far as rhyme, imagery, and voice are concerned. I could probably do better as far as metre were concerned if I were classically trained in writing Shakespearean quatrains, but alas, I have not the discipline or interest in writing such a poem frought in tedium. I know that must sound horribly cold and disrespectful to Shakespeare and those who appreciate his work, as do I, but I don't care to try to attempt something I know I'm not good at. I believe this poem is generally free of commonplace and hackn eyed images, save for perhaps the mention of Christopher Columbus. I know he is mentioned in quite a few poems. Perhaps he is considered an unnecessary abstraction, I'm not sure. I meant the Columbus reference only as an aside to demonstrate an example of people having gone on journeys, and I thought Columbus was particularly cogent to use since he had traveled to Latin America before. I don't think I've used any unnecessary inversions in the poem, or at least, if I have they are minimally invasive. I tried not to overload the poem with too many adjectives. If I have, that is my fault and my fault alone.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.